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The First 60 Days: Ramping Up Responsibilities

The First 60 Days: Ramping Up Responsibilities



Believe it or not, 30 days have passed since our last post on the 30-60-90 day training program. In that post, we discussed the best way to bring your newest employees up to speed so they can begin contributing to the conversations and workload within your department. At 60 days, the conversations and workload will transition into more independent work and leadership roles, depending on the employee’s position within your company. Once your new employee has successfully accomplished the tasks on the 30-day checklist, start the transition to the next level.

  • Incorporate deeper experiential learning opportunities. Now that your new employee has a basic understanding of how your company operates, begin including them on bigger-picture assignments and conversations. If they are a manager or senior-level employee, include them on pertinent client-facing meetings or employee reviews. Not only will this give your new employee a chance to understand group dynamics, but it will reinforce their place in the company with your established employees who may be adjusting to new leadership.
  • Let them take over tasks, but stay available. There are generally two reasons to have a new employee: company growth or filling a recently opened position. Either way, there are responsibilities being shifted around to accommodate the learning curve. Once the 30-day newness has waned, hand over some of those tasks that require more problem solving or teamwork. This is a chance for you to see how your new employee handles challenges and works with others. If they have questions, by all means be around to answer them, but give some distance, allow for autonomy. You hired them because you trusted they could do the job, so give them room to establish their own work and management style.
  • Encourage interdepartmental training and collaboration. Pretty much every employee on your team has been with the company longer than your new employee, which means there are resources other than yourself for training. Whether the training is scheduled or organic at this point depends on the project flow of your organization, but allow your new employee to sit in on others’ projects, especially if they will be managing your established employees. In some cases, there may be an opportunity for the new employee to take on portions of that task, even if only on a temporary or as-needed basis. Knowing how each member of a team completes their tasks only makes the team stronger.
  • Offer constructive correction, but remember to congratulate success. Some decisions and potential solutions end up being the wrong way to approach a challenge, and new employees need to be made aware of these issues when they arise. But instead of presenting a solution as “wrong,” suggest an alternative way of handling the situation in the context of previous similar challenges. In the same vein, when there is a success or obvious improvement, celebrate it so those methods continue in an upward pattern.

As your newest team member reaches their 60 days, the most important element of their development in your company is to establish them as an essential part of your team. At the end of the next 30 days, the expectation is for them to be a fully contributing and resourceful addition.