The YGS Group

 
Invitation Accepted: Making and Keeping Commitments

Invitation Accepted: Making and Keeping Commitments

Last week we discussed the importance of staying in tune with your workload and being honest when you can’t commit to taking on additional projects. While it’s important for you to accept responsibility for your own work, your team can be used as a resource to help one another be productive and stay on top of commitments. Here are a few ideas to consider applying to your workflow so commitments are better met.

  • Make meetings easy. A significant challenge in fast-paced work environments is making meetings productive for everyone involved. Everyone in the office needs to be able to spend their time wisely, so scheduling meetings with a specific purpose and including an agenda will go a long way in keeping meetings as efficient as possible. Defining these expectations also make it more likely that people will commit to attending. Bonus tip: Keep your calendar up-to-date so people schedule meetings when they know you’re available.
  • Be flexible. Rescheduling meetings and changing deadlines shouldn’t be a regular occurrence for one person with the same excuse every time, but it’s important to remember that everyone is juggling multiple commitments, and sometimes they overlap. Being mindful and respectful of compounding deadlines is an important aspect of contributing to a solid team dynamic.
  • Do what you say you’ll do. It’s a simple concept, but sometimes it gets lost in the hustle and bustle. A lot of our time depends on someone else returning our emails or phone calls, and sometimes we are the ones who need to be more timely when returning emails or phone calls. Get in the habit of setting aside time to follow up on those emails that have been escaping you, and take 10 minutes at the end of your day to re-evaluate your to-do list.

Being known as a committed team member is a strong trait to carry with you. Be sure you’re encouraging and supporting the rest of your co-workers (and clients!) by modeling commitment and praising pro-commitment behavior.